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Siem Reap, Cambodia

Day 2

Woke up ridiculously early yet again, this time to see the sunrise over the Angkor Wat. We had hired bikes (the human-powered variety) the night before and set out about 5:30 a.m. We didn't really know where we were going and, despite having a map, managed to get lost. We finally made it to Angkor Wat but had somehow missed the ticket booth (to our credit, there were no signs or street lights around). We had to cycle halfway back to Siem Reap to find the ticket booth but by that stage the sun had risen, so we gave up, cycled back to our guesthouse and went to bed instead.

The next time we got up (at a more respectable 9 a.m.) we hit the streets for breakfast. Danny found THE most amazing bread we've eaten on this trip. Thanks to the strong French influence in Cambodia, bakeries are common and their food is exceptionally good (bread was not great in Thailand). Amazing that something as simple as bread can put us in a great mood.

We hired a tuk-tuk for the day to transport us to the temples that were further away from the centre of town (e.g. the Roluos temples and the Grand Loop). Tuk-tuks are much slower here than in Bangkok, but they are a little bigger (can sit four instead of two) and more comfortable. I read that it's better to see the smaller temples before seeing the big ones (i.e. Angkor) because if you did it the other way around, everything would be a disappointment after Angkor. This was how I was consoling myself after the missed sunrise this morning. The temples we saw held my attention much longer than I expected and, surprisingly, they were all different from each other. We visited roughly 10 small temples, although these "small" ones still reached up to a kilometre long. Our driver was incredibly friendly, taking us everywhere we wanted to go. He even went back to a temple we had already visited so that we could climb to the top to watch the sunset (which was not worth it). 

At night we wandered through the markets, once again being accosted at every step. Children as young as five knew the drill and pulled out all the right lines to make a sale (they were as cute as they were annoying). For dinner we had a Khmer/Cambodian BBQ (similar to what we experienced in Bangkok). We decided to be adventurous and go for the degustation of meats, which included chicken, beef, squid, crocodile and snake. Snake was okay (similar to lamb) but crocodile was really good, like chicken but stronger. It was a great meal and we were very, very full at the end (for a change).